Novel Notes

NOVEL NOTES

A monthly e-newsletter for forage producers.

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Novel endophyte tall fescue is a tough plant and it does not have to be babied.   

I would like to set something straight with this article. I am afraid that our emphasis on taking good care of your new stands of novel endophyte tall fescue have created the misconception that it is a weak plant that needs to be babied to survive. This is true for many alternative forage crops includingContinue reading “Novel endophyte tall fescue is a tough plant and it does not have to be babied.   “

Pasture renovation improves forage quality for schools horses

Horses at a Central Kentucky career and technical high school have lush paddocks to graze on this school year thanks to help from the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment.   Locust Trace AgriScience Center is a school in Lexington that introduces high school students in Fayette and Woodford counties to many agriculture disciplines. Equine science is one of theContinue reading “Pasture renovation improves forage quality for schools horses”

The Strength to Change

Working the land makes agricultural producers farm strong, but pivoting to new, unfamiliar practices takes a different kind of strength. The strength to change. There is gym strong and then there is farm strong. Gym strong looks good. Weights, trainers, protein drinks and persistence sculpt a magazine-ready physique. There’s nothing wrong with gym strong. FarmContinue reading “The Strength to Change”

Novel Endophyte Fescue Conversion begins in the spring

Kentucky 31 (K31) tall fescue is without question the dominant forage species and cultivar in Missouri and it is for good reason. E.N. Fergus, forage specialist from the University of Kentucky in the 1930s and 1940s, did a great favor for the livestock industry, when he propagated K31 fescue. Fescue in general is palatable withContinue reading “Novel Endophyte Fescue Conversion begins in the spring”

Evaluating costs and benefits of renovating endophyte-infected pastures

Nearly 98% of Missouri’s pastureland is tall fescue infected with an endophyte that can cause fescue toxicosis in grazing livestock. Fescue toxicosis lowers reproduction rates, milk production, gain and weaning weights. It also causes health problems, including lameness and heat stress. By replacing toxic fescue with other forages, producers eliminate animal exposure to the harmfulContinue reading “Evaluating costs and benefits of renovating endophyte-infected pastures”

Triple Creek Journal: Our worst year for winter annuals ever!

In 2013 we killed about 25 acres of our Kentucky 31-based pastures and started using annuals to upgrade our forage program, with future conversion to Novel Endophyte Tall Fescue in mind.  We really liked the winter and summer annuals for our young growing stock, and for the pasture-based beef program that was developing at thatContinue reading “Triple Creek Journal: Our worst year for winter annuals ever!”

Keeping Your New Year’s Resolution: Tall Fescue Replacement Information

Earlier this year, Matt Poore made a New Year’s resolution to convert acres of toxic tall fescue to novel endophyte fescue on his farm (see previous Novel Notes article). I jumped on the bandwagon and made the same resolution. Even though the non-toxic seed that completes these fescue conversions won’t go in the ground untilContinue reading “Keeping Your New Year’s Resolution: Tall Fescue Replacement Information”

Triple Creek Journal:  Renovating a novel endophyte tall fescue pasture

We planted our first novel endophyte tall fescue in the autumn of 2000.  It was a difficult time for us as my dad had suffered a major heart attack in late September and we were all at the hospital in Lynchburg when we should have been planting the fescue.  The planting, which had been plannedContinue reading “Triple Creek Journal:  Renovating a novel endophyte tall fescue pasture”

Control Seedheads in Cool Season Forages for Improved Pasture Quality and Effective Renovation

Cool-season perennial grasses like tall fescue, orchardgrass and bluegrass are very important in many pasture systems. Each of these grasses only produces seedheads during the spring, and managing to prevent those seedheads from reaching maturity will improve the quality of the pasture during late spring and summer, and will be a critical first step inContinue reading “Control Seedheads in Cool Season Forages for Improved Pasture Quality and Effective Renovation”

Understanding Fescue Variety Terminology

All fescue varieties are not the same In fescue seed advertisements, one may see terminology like “endophyte-free, friendly or novel endophyte, beneficial endophyte or toxic endophyte.” Some ads may not mention an endophyte at all. All fescue varieties are not the same; therefore, producers need to have a clear understanding of the differences among varietiesContinue reading “Understanding Fescue Variety Terminology”

My New Year’s Resolution:  Renovate Some Tall Fescue Pasture in 2022!

Over my career, I have seen many solutions to the tall fescue problem suggested, tested, and then eventually shown to be ineffective.  I have personally been involved in many studies that tested various feed additives, forage management approaches, energy and protein supplementation programs and cattle with fescue tolerance.  While some of this work is encouraging,Continue reading “My New Year’s Resolution:  Renovate Some Tall Fescue Pasture in 2022!”

Virtual Workshop for Producers March 8th

The Alliance for Grassland Renewal is proud to be offering a virtual workshop from producers on March 8th. This three hour evening program will include presentations on tall fescue toxicosis and endophyte types, improving animal performance, establishment, seed quality and on-farm economics. Registration will be available soon, watch your email for more details or checkContinue reading “Virtual Workshop for Producers March 8th”

Pasture Research Illustrates Benefits of Endophytes to Grass and Animal

Introduction: Demonstrating the benefit of non-toxic endophyte-infected pasture grasses on animal performance is well documented and is equal to that of non-infected tall fescue.  However, it is more difficult to demonstrate that which the endophyte imparts on the grass.  Research conducted by the University of Georgia, in collaboration with Agrinostics Ltd. Co., is demonstrating endophyteContinue reading “Pasture Research Illustrates Benefits of Endophytes to Grass and Animal”

Triple Creek Journal: We are using a variety of hay feeding methods this year.

As winter approaches we continue to be extremely dry.  We have not had more than a few tenths of an inch of rain at a time since late September, and it was already dry then.  Our stockpiled tall fescue pastures have the least available grazing seen in recent years; less than half of normal. WeContinue reading “Triple Creek Journal: We are using a variety of hay feeding methods this year.”

Comparison of Commercially Available Novel-Endophyte Tall Fescue Forage Varieties now available from NC Cooperative Extension.

The Alliance for Grassland Renewal and the Amazing Grazing Program at North Carolina State University are happy to announce the publication of a new, peer-reviewed fact sheet focused on comparing the novel endophyte tall fescue products available to farmers.  There are currently 7 novel endophtye tall fescue products on the market.  While we often talkContinue reading “Comparison of Commercially Available Novel-Endophyte Tall Fescue Forage Varieties now available from NC Cooperative Extension.”

Alliance for Grassland Renewal hosts Symposium at NatGLC

There is great interest in improving ecosystem services from grasslands through adaptive grazing management.  Short, intensive grazing bouts followed by long rest periods is the key to all rotational grazing management systems.  Implementing proven grazing practices in an adaptive approach that addresses the environmental, economic and social needs of the system improves soil health (throughContinue reading “Alliance for Grassland Renewal hosts Symposium at NatGLC”

Triple Creek Journal:  Can You Find 4-leaf Clovers without Looking for Them?

As I continue to develop my skills as an adaptive grazier, I find that I am more tuned in to what is going on and I am making better and quicker decisions regarding pasture allocation and animal management. One of the goals of the Amazing Grazing Program is to get farmers to think about theirContinue reading “Triple Creek Journal:  Can You Find 4-leaf Clovers without Looking for Them?”

Right Source, Rate, Timing and Placement: More Bang for The Pasture Fertilizer Buck

Since we visited last month, nitrogen price has continued to increase. Even so, nitrogen remains an important part of grassland ecosystems and is closely related to both dry matter yield and crude protein concentrations in grasses and non-leguminous forbs. At the Kentucky Forage and Grassland Council’s annual fall Kentucky Grazing Conference, Drs. John Grove andContinue reading “Right Source, Rate, Timing and Placement: More Bang for The Pasture Fertilizer Buck”

Navigating High Fertilizer Prices in Ruminant Livestock Operations

In the last year, the cost of fertilizer had increased more than 55%, 60%, and 65%, for nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, respectively (Figure 1). The price of nitrogen could continue to increase due to the idling of N manufacturing capacity caused by weather issues and increased natural gas and shipping costs. Nitrogen prices could conceivablyContinue reading “Navigating High Fertilizer Prices in Ruminant Livestock Operations”

Creep-grazing brassica and small grain forages for fall-born calves

The Virginia Tech Shenandoah Valley Agricultural Research and Extension Center (SVAREC) switched from a spring-calving herd to fall-calving six years ago. At that time, a growing body of research indicating increased profitability realized by fall- vs. spring-calving herds when reliant on tall fescue forage. The AREC herd made the switch to stay relevant to VirginiaContinue reading “Creep-grazing brassica and small grain forages for fall-born calves”

Comparison of Novel Endophtye Tall Fescue Varieties is Now Available

Tall Fescue planting season is upon us and we have had questions about which is the best Novel Endophtye Tall Fescue to plant.  We have posted an article on the Alliance for Grassland Renewal that compares the commercially available varieties of Novel Endophyte Tall Fescues, along with KY-31 and a popular Endophyte-Free variety.  The originContinue reading “Comparison of Novel Endophtye Tall Fescue Varieties is Now Available”

The Case for Hay Testing

One of my favorite activities as an Extension specialist is helping beef cattle producers put together nutritionally sound, cost-effective winter-feeding programs for cows and backgrounding calves.  Here in central Missouri, that almost always includes some level of hay feeding for part of the year. Yet one of my biggest frustrations comes when asking a producerContinue reading “The Case for Hay Testing”

Time to stockpile forages for late autumn and winter grazing

It is time to start stockpiling late summer and early autumn growth of forages for grazing in the late autumn and winter.  The practice of allowing forage to accumulate rather than grazing it or making it into hay has great potential to extend the grazing season and reduce winter feeding costs.  Once other pastures areContinue reading “Time to stockpile forages for late autumn and winter grazing”

Symposium at 8th National GLC Conference Announced: “Renovate to Regenerate: Establishing ecologically beneficial cool-season perennial mixtures in the tall fescue belt”.

The Alliance for Grassland Renewal is excited to invite you to participate in a symposium at the 8th National GLC conference, December 6-9, 2021 in Myrtle Beach, SC.  The focus of the symposium is how to use regenerative grazing principles to develop highly productive perennial pastures for the tall fescue belt.  There is great interestContinue reading “Symposium at 8th National GLC Conference Announced: “Renovate to Regenerate: Establishing ecologically beneficial cool-season perennial mixtures in the tall fescue belt”.”

Drought Affects Seed Size and Your Novel Endophyte Tall Fescue Renovation Practices

The impact of the drought and heat conditions on seed production in Oregon’s Willamette Valley was outlined in a report written by Drew Denman on July 15.  Drew pointed out that seed production in 2021 will be reduced by 40-50% as a result of the climatic conditions.  Reduced seed yield raises concerns beyond the availabilityContinue reading “Drought Affects Seed Size and Your Novel Endophyte Tall Fescue Renovation Practices”

Oregon’s Willamette Valley Conditions to impact fall seed availability

Affectionately known as the “The Valley”, Willamette Valley is a fertile growing region, where most of the forage type grass seed is produced in the US. Acreage is highly sought after, and every acre counts in the final production yield for all companies that have ownership in the Valley. This year, several challenges are mountingContinue reading “Oregon’s Willamette Valley Conditions to impact fall seed availability”

Reduce Wintering Cost with Stockpiled Fescue

Ever rising input costs have beef cattle producers constantly looking at ways to lower production expenses and maintain profitability. Production budgets show the largest expense category for cow/calf enterprises to be winter feeding costs. Because of this, beef and forage researchers have focused heavily on ways producers can lower this major production expense. One methodContinue reading “Reduce Wintering Cost with Stockpiled Fescue”

Notes from the 2021 Fescue Renovation Workshop

When a group of interested individuals met for the 2021 Novel Tall Fescue Renovation Workshop on March 23 at the MU Southwest Research Center looking for answers to fescue questions, they were not disappointed. The line-up of expert speakers on the subject was impressive. Opening the workshop, Craig Roberts, MU Extension Program Director of Agronomy,Continue reading “Notes from the 2021 Fescue Renovation Workshop”

Tall Fescue Pasture Renovation Made Simple

Animal performance problems related to toxic tall fescue are well documented, and there are many things that you can do to help with the problem.  Changes in nutrition, fertilization and animal genetics all may benefit animals suffering from eating fescue toxins, but nothing works like growing forage without toxins.  There are many “systems” for replacingContinue reading “Tall Fescue Pasture Renovation Made Simple”

How You Manage Your Pastures Might be Important for You and Your Country!

Quite likely, we’ve all given thought to how we might manage our land in the best manner to be as productive as possible, while helping to protect the environment from harmful chemicals and to limit nutrient loss to adjacent streams.  But have you considered that how you manage your land might be equally important inContinue reading “How You Manage Your Pastures Might be Important for You and Your Country!”

Adaptive Grazing Management Provides Multiple Benefits

Concepts about grazing management continue to evolve, but the fundamental principal of short grazing bouts followed by relatively long rest periods doesn’t change.  Managed rotational grazing in some form goes back to the domestication of livestock.  The rotational grazing system may be implemented in various ways, ranging from movement through many permanent paddocks, to herdingContinue reading “Adaptive Grazing Management Provides Multiple Benefits”

Alliance Hosts Successful Workshops in 2021

The Alliance for Grassland Renewal hosted three Novel Tall Fescue Renovation Workshops in 2021. The first was virtual, and welcomed 120 producers, extension agents and veterinarians for a three night program in late February. In March, traditional one day workshops were held in Mt. Vernon, MO and Lexington, KY and welcomed 16 and 20 attendees,Continue reading “Alliance Hosts Successful Workshops in 2021”

Last chance to register for Novel Tall Fescue Renovation Workshops

The Alliance for Grassland Renewal has two final workshops for 2021 coming up: March 23 in Mt. Vernon, MO and March 25 in Lexington, KY. Both events will be in-person, full day workshops focused on understanding tall fescue toxicosis, and establishing and managing novel tall fescue varieties. Spaces are limited, cost to attend is $65,Continue reading “Last chance to register for Novel Tall Fescue Renovation Workshops”

Control Efforts for Poison Hemlock and Buttercups Begin in Late Winter

Late winter is one of the best times of the year to assess fields and fencerows for presence of cool-season weeds. Further, the preferred time to implement control tactics can often be in March as daytime air temperatures begin to rise and are maintained above 55F. This is when cool-season weeds are younger and beginContinue reading “Control Efforts for Poison Hemlock and Buttercups Begin in Late Winter”

Multi-generational Farm Family Adds Novel Fescues to Their Operation

Gene and Glenda Fay Brown have been married for 61 years and live on their Century Farm in Cedar County, Missouri. After high school graduation, Gene purchased his first 100 acres of land and needed to pay for it. He took off for Kansas City and a job at the Firestone Tire Rubber Plant, roomingContinue reading “Multi-generational Farm Family Adds Novel Fescues to Their Operation”

Register today for Novel Tall Fescue Renovation Workshops

The 2021 Virtual Novel Tall Fescue Renovation Workshop is just one week away, beginning on February 23rd at 6pm (eastern) and will continue on February 24th and 25th in the evenings. This three night program is an adaption of the one day in-person events and will cover all of the same topics. Cost is justContinue reading “Register today for Novel Tall Fescue Renovation Workshops”

Promoting Novel Fescues with On-Farm Demos and “Sticky Messages”

Toxic, endophyte infected tall fescue acreage is extensive and presents the classic dilemma for producers:  animal health and performance vs. pasture persistence.  One of the Alliance for Grassland Renewal’s incentive programs is “to assist farmers in the costly but beneficial transition from toxic to novel tall fescue”. Novel fescue varieties have been available for 20Continue reading “Promoting Novel Fescues with On-Farm Demos and “Sticky Messages””

Stockpiled tall fescue and whole cottonseed go together well

The first supplementation study we did with stockpiled tall fescue has now been almost 25 years ago, but that work continues to impact how I manage on our home farm.  We developed Angus cross heifers on stockpiled Kentucky-31 tall fescue with or without a supplement of 2 lbs of whole cottonseed.  We had earlier doneContinue reading “Stockpiled tall fescue and whole cottonseed go together well”

February is the ideal time to frost-seed with clover in much of the tall fescue belt.

Clover is often a valuable component of tall fescue-based pasture systems.  Both white and red clovers have great value.  Each fix nitrogen for the system, and improve forage crude protein and energy. These attributes improve livestock performance whether you are grazing toxic KY-31 or Novel Endophyte Tall Fescue.  Additionally, red clover provides isoflavones which areContinue reading “February is the ideal time to frost-seed with clover in much of the tall fescue belt.”

Registration now open for all 2021 workshops

Registration for two in-person workshops is now open. The Alliance for Grassland Renewal is hosting in-person workshops in Mt. Vernon, MO on March 23 and Lexington, KY on March 25 in addition to the three-night virtual workshop on February 23-25. A previously scheduled workshop in Georgia has been canceled. All three workshops will include discussionsContinue reading “Registration now open for all 2021 workshops”

A Holistic Approach to Understanding Fescue Toxicosis: A Path to Drug Therapy?

Undoubtedly, if you have followed fescue toxicosis research developments you have seen the term “ergovaline” prominently in the publications as to the toxin causing fescue toxicosis.  Ergovaline is a chemical that belongs to a specific group of toxins called “ergot alkaloids”.  A research team from the University of Georgia (UGA), Emory University, and the UniversityContinue reading “A Holistic Approach to Understanding Fescue Toxicosis: A Path to Drug Therapy?”

Weed control in newly established cool season grass stands

The weather in many areas this past fall has been conducive for excellent growth on late summer or early fall seeded stands of cool season grasses, such as novel endophyte tall fescue. Most extension guidelines in the mid-Atlantic region recommend establishing perennial cool season grasses during this period to avoid the competition of summer annualContinue reading “Weed control in newly established cool season grass stands”

Breaking the Chain, the Novel Endophyte Tall Fescue Experience of Darrel Franson

If you look at grandma’s wallpaper long enough, the tendency is to be content with it, perhaps even appreciate it. That was the experience Darrel Franson had in 1993 when moving 700 miles south from his central Minnesota farm, to establish his 127-ac farm of near 100% endophyte-infected KY-31 tall fescue in southwest Missouri, nearContinue reading “Breaking the Chain, the Novel Endophyte Tall Fescue Experience of Darrel Franson”

Virtual Novel Tall Fescue Renovation Workshop Registration Now Open

The Alliance for Grassland Renewal is proud to be offering a virtual Novel Tall Fescue Renovation Workshop in 2021. The three night event, February 23-25, will include all of the topics from our in-person workshops and is open to producers across the US. Each night will begin at 6:00 pm EDT and end by 8:30Continue reading “Virtual Novel Tall Fescue Renovation Workshop Registration Now Open”

Mineral Programs are Key to Efficient Production on Forages

No matter how good your forages are, they still may be deficient in one or more minerals.  This is especially true for the trace minerals copper, zinc and selenium, and of course, salt.  Some forages may also be deficient in calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, manganese or other minerals. In my experience, all really good cattle productionContinue reading “Mineral Programs are Key to Efficient Production on Forages”

2021 Virginia Forage and Grassland Council Virtual Winter Forage Conference

Dates: January 18 through January 22, 2021 The Virginia Forage and Grassland Council (VFGC) is pleased to announce our 2021 Winter Forage Conference: Building Resilience in Grass-Based Farms. This year’s conference will be virtual, and will feature a combination of live online presentations, videos, and live Question and Answer sessions. The virtual conference will spotlightContinue reading “2021 Virginia Forage and Grassland Council Virtual Winter Forage Conference”

Developing Heifers on Novel Endophyte Tall Fescue

Heifer development is critical for a strong cow/calf production system.  Replacement heifers are typically produced on-farm to replace from 15 to 20% of the cow herd annually.  Heifers are selected from the calf crop based on their own performance, and the performance/genetic merit of their dam and sire.  Heifer development programs have changed over theContinue reading “Developing Heifers on Novel Endophyte Tall Fescue”

The Alliance For Grassland Renewal Announces dates for virtual workshop and three in person trainings for 2021.

An online, three night Novel Tall Fescue Renovation Workshop will be he held February 23-25, and is open to producers across the US who are interested in learning more about toxic and novel tall fescue endophytes. In person trainings will also be held in Athens, GA (March 18), Mt. Vernon, MO (March 23), and Lexington,Continue reading “The Alliance For Grassland Renewal Announces dates for virtual workshop and three in person trainings for 2021.”

Calving First-Calf Heifers on Novel Endophyte Tall Fescue is Hard to Beat

This past year, I have spent a lot of quality time at the farm, which has been a joy.  My family runs 110 cows on the family farm near Virgilina, Virginia.    We calve starting October 15 and have a tall fescue-based system.  As I write this we are calving and getting along quite well.  InContinue reading “Calving First-Calf Heifers on Novel Endophyte Tall Fescue is Hard to Beat”

Novel Fescue: One Year In

Hear from Virginia cattle producer Miller Adams one year after he began converting pastures to novel endophyte tall fescue. ~ Video produced by Becky Sz The Alliance for Grassland Renewal is a national organization focused on enhancing the appropriate adoption of novel endophyte tall fescue technology through education, incentives, self-regulation and promotion.  For more resourcesContinue reading “Novel Fescue: One Year In”

Strange Behavior Exhibited by Cattle Consuming Toxic Tall Fescue

Here in the South it is not uncommon to see cattle standing in farm ponds that have not been fenced off.  That behavior is common in the summer months when it is hot and humid, especially if there is limited shade to escape the scorching sun.  However, cattle may exhibit strange behavior when grazing pasturesContinue reading “Strange Behavior Exhibited by Cattle Consuming Toxic Tall Fescue”

Amazing Endophyte, part 3: Use Tall Fescue Cultivars with Novel Endophytes

Epichloë coenophiala, the fungal endophyte found in tall fescue, can cause toxicosis by producing ergot alkaloids, but not all isolates are identical. For example, dogs are the same species, Canis familiaris, but different breeds represent genetic diversity of the species. Most Epichloë coenophiala in the fescue belt of the United States produce ergot alkaloids andContinue reading “Amazing Endophyte, part 3: Use Tall Fescue Cultivars with Novel Endophytes”

Research Highlight: Variability of Ergovaline and Total Ergot Alkaloid Expression among Endophytic Tall Fescue Cultivars

Tall fescue is one of the most widely grown grasses in the United States. Most plants are infected with an endophyte that produces high concentrations of ergot alkaloids, which cause fescue toxicosis in livestock. Of all ergot alkaloids, ergovaline has been determined to be one of the main causes of fescue toxicosis. The economic lossesContinue reading “Research Highlight: Variability of Ergovaline and Total Ergot Alkaloid Expression among Endophytic Tall Fescue Cultivars”

The Adams Farm to host Virginia Forage and Grassland Council’s Fall Pasture Walk

This event will highlight the entire process of novel fescue conversion, including site prep, varieties, seeding rates and dates, recommended fertilization,  weed control and grazing management the following season.  It is hosted at a farm where the farmer has enjoyed the success of a fall 2019 planting of novel fescue and a fall 2020 plantingContinue reading “The Adams Farm to host Virginia Forage and Grassland Council’s Fall Pasture Walk”

Details are Critical in Achieving Successful Stand Establishment

Many of our readers are preparing to plant cool season forages.  Whether you are planting annuals in a regular rotation, or are transitioning into improved perennial forages (like novel endophyte tall fescue), the process of planting is one of the critical times you need to pay attention to details.  Most of our recommended management practicesContinue reading “Details are Critical in Achieving Successful Stand Establishment”

First Exemplary Service Award given to Tony and Margaret Stratton

This year, Tony and Margaret Stratton received the first award bestowed by the Alliance for Grassland Renewal.  The Exemplary Service Award recognizes extraordinary contribution, and the Strattons have more than earned that recognition. Tony was a charter member of the Alliance for Grassland Renewal.  Of all board members, he has been the most knowledgeable andContinue reading “First Exemplary Service Award given to Tony and Margaret Stratton”

Amazing Endophyte, part 2: Some Tall Fescue Endophytes Cause Toxicity to Livestock

The presence of a fungal endophyte (endo = inside, phyte = plant) in tall fescue can limit animal productivity even though it enhances the grass’s ability to persist. Endophytes produce compounds like peramine, lolines and ergot alkaloids. Each of these provides protection against some insects, but the ergot alkaloids also cause toxicity to mammals. TelltaleContinue reading “Amazing Endophyte, part 2: Some Tall Fescue Endophytes Cause Toxicity to Livestock”

New-Crop Novel Endophyte Tall Fescue Seed Reaching Dealers in Early September

We have had a lot of questions recently from farmers about when novel endophyte tall fescue seed will be available.  Farmers can go today and buy either Kentucky 31 or many types of endophyte-free tall fescues at farm supply stores, but may be told that novel endophyte tall tescue seed is not yet available.  ThisContinue reading “New-Crop Novel Endophyte Tall Fescue Seed Reaching Dealers in Early September”

The Alliance for Grassland Renewal Welcomes Dr. Sam Ingram from Corteva Agrisciences to the Board

The Alliance for Grassland Renewal is pleased to announce that Dr. Sam Ingram from Corteva Agrisciences will be joining the board.  Corteva was a founding member of the Alliance which is a collaborative of Industry, Academia and Governmental members working to encourage and support the appropriate adoption of Novel Endophyte Tall Fescue.  Dr. Ingram startedContinue reading “The Alliance for Grassland Renewal Welcomes Dr. Sam Ingram from Corteva Agrisciences to the Board”

Amazing Endophtes, part 1: Introduction to the Endophyte

A lush green tall fescue pasture can often hide an unseen dark side. Many livestock producers recognize that although tall fescue is considered a quality forage, the presence of a fungal endophyte (endo = inside, phyte = plant) can limit animal productivity. Unfortunately, most fescue grown in the United States (largely the Kentucky 31 variety)Continue reading “Amazing Endophtes, part 1: Introduction to the Endophyte”

Workshops Cure For Toxic Fescue Problems

Brownfield Ag News reporter Julie Harker interviews University of Missouri Extension forage specialist Craig Roberts about renovating toxic fescue pastures with novel endophyte fescue.  Fescue renovation and management is taught in workshops every year throughout the Fescue Belt. The Alliance for Grassland Renewal is a national organization focused on enhancing the appropriate adoption of novelContinue reading “Workshops Cure For Toxic Fescue Problems”

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