Virtual Workshop for Producers March 8th

The Alliance for Grassland Renewal is proud to be offering a virtual workshop from producers on March 8th. This three hour evening program will include presentations on tall fescue toxicosis and endophyte types, improving animal performance, establishment, seed quality and on-farm economics. Registration will be available soon, watch your email for more details or checkContinue reading “Virtual Workshop for Producers March 8th”

Pasture Research Illustrates Benefits of Endophytes to Grass and Animal

Introduction: Demonstrating the benefit of non-toxic endophyte-infected pasture grasses on animal performance is well documented and is equal to that of non-infected tall fescue.  However, it is more difficult to demonstrate that which the endophyte imparts on the grass.  Research conducted by the University of Georgia, in collaboration with Agrinostics Ltd. Co., is demonstrating endophyteContinue reading “Pasture Research Illustrates Benefits of Endophytes to Grass and Animal”

Triple Creek Journal: We are using a variety of hay feeding methods this year.

As winter approaches we continue to be extremely dry.  We have not had more than a few tenths of an inch of rain at a time since late September, and it was already dry then.  Our stockpiled tall fescue pastures have the least available grazing seen in recent years; less than half of normal. WeContinue reading “Triple Creek Journal: We are using a variety of hay feeding methods this year.”

Bale Grazing at it’s Best

Greg Halich is an economist by trade. Halich’s day job is performed at the University of Kentucky in Lexington, but by nights and weekends he raises grass-fed beef cattle. He considers himself a slightly above average rotational grazer, mostly limited by time, but if you really want to get him excited, just ask what heContinue reading “Bale Grazing at it’s Best”

In person workshops planned for March 2022

The Alliance for Grassland Renewal is please to announce dates for two in-person workshops in March of 2022. One Wednesday, March 23rd, a one-day, producer focused workshop will be held in Spring Hill, Tennessee in collaboration with the University of Tennessee. One week later, the workshop will be held in Boonsboro, Maryland on March 30th,Continue reading “In person workshops planned for March 2022”

Comparison of Commercially Available Novel-Endophyte Tall Fescue Forage Varieties now available from NC Cooperative Extension.

The Alliance for Grassland Renewal and the Amazing Grazing Program at North Carolina State University are happy to announce the publication of a new, peer-reviewed fact sheet focused on comparing the novel endophyte tall fescue products available to farmers.  There are currently 7 novel endophtye tall fescue products on the market.  While we often talkContinue reading “Comparison of Commercially Available Novel-Endophyte Tall Fescue Forage Varieties now available from NC Cooperative Extension.”

Economics of Tall Fescue Pasture Renovation

One of the most common questions I get regarding Novel Endophyte Tall Fescue is how much it will cost to establish it and whether or not it will pay off.  This is a complex question because there are very many factors that will impact the financial outcome.  To address the question, an agricultural economist atContinue reading “Economics of Tall Fescue Pasture Renovation”

Alliance for Grassland Renewal hosts Symposium at NatGLC

There is great interest in improving ecosystem services from grasslands through adaptive grazing management.  Short, intensive grazing bouts followed by long rest periods is the key to all rotational grazing management systems.  Implementing proven grazing practices in an adaptive approach that addresses the environmental, economic and social needs of the system improves soil health (throughContinue reading “Alliance for Grassland Renewal hosts Symposium at NatGLC”

Triple Creek Journal:  Can You Find 4-leaf Clovers without Looking for Them?

As I continue to develop my skills as an adaptive grazier, I find that I am more tuned in to what is going on and I am making better and quicker decisions regarding pasture allocation and animal management. One of the goals of the Amazing Grazing Program is to get farmers to think about theirContinue reading “Triple Creek Journal:  Can You Find 4-leaf Clovers without Looking for Them?”

Right Source, Rate, Timing and Placement: More Bang for The Pasture Fertilizer Buck

Since we visited last month, nitrogen price has continued to increase. Even so, nitrogen remains an important part of grassland ecosystems and is closely related to both dry matter yield and crude protein concentrations in grasses and non-leguminous forbs. At the Kentucky Forage and Grassland Council’s annual fall Kentucky Grazing Conference, Drs. John Grove andContinue reading “Right Source, Rate, Timing and Placement: More Bang for The Pasture Fertilizer Buck”